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The Creamery

 

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Happy days

For the past few Sundays I’ve found myself at The Creamery soaking up the clean, crisp interior, the salted caramel sauce and the overwhelmingly cheerful sense of community.  I’ve queued with the kids, grans and couples for my favourite flavour and sat outside watching the side streets ooze families from their depths, sending them streaming into the cafe. Kate Scheirer’s dessert cafe is a hive of activity, drawing people in with its promise of  nostalgic bonhomie and delectable classics.

James Taylor  the original Taylor ice cream churn (he now has a sibling, Taylor Swift)

The Creamery serves, in its own words: “honest-to-goodness, made-from-scratch, not-your-average ice cream”. Ingredients are sourced as locally as possible and where not, they support local, artisanal businesses. They buy chocolate from CocoaFair and coffee from Rosetta Roastery, both of whom process imported beans with home-grown flair.

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The Foodbarn

Food Barn's 50% off winter lunch special

Food Barn’s winter special*

I’d grown tired of hearing about The Foodbarn without having experienced it myself. My friend Julie Carter once invited me to join her there for lunch – then took her husband instead. A year on and I’d arranged to meet another friend, Clare Yeowell, for lunch in Noordhoek. I was finally going to try Franck Dangereux’s famous food and at half the price, no less. Cape Town winter specials are a beautiful thing, they’re the local’s reward for sharing the city with tourists for the other 8 months of the year.

Clare Yeowell from Classic Marmalade

Clare Yeowell from Classic Marmalade

As with most of my Cape Town friends, I’d met Clare via the food markets, City Bowl Market on Hope to be exact,  where I regularly buy her delectable Classic marmalade, jams and preserves. Back then she’d agreed to let me spend a day with her to write about her product (which I did here) and that was all the time it took for the two of us to click. We’ve been buds ever since, despite her transcendence to the giddy heights of international acclaim for her marmalade. Clare has a palate of note and I knew she’d be the perfect companion on my maiden Foodbarn voyage.

The cosy interior

The cosy interior

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Ocean Jewels Fresh Fish

The Fish Lady from the Biscuit Mill

The Fish Lady from the Biscuit Mill

Julie Carter has had her Ocean Jewels stand at the Neighbourgoods market every Saturday since it first opened 7 years ago. It’s a foodie landmark and you’d be hard pressed to find someone in Cape Town who doesn’t know about her famous Tuna burger. She also does beautifully fresh things with Salmon and makes a Yellowtail spring roll that’s nigh on impossible to resist. All this, with her bubbly personality thrown in for good measure.

No introduction required

No introduction required

Jules sources her fish locally from around the peninsula with a guy in every port (her dad’s a commercial fisherman) and don’t try visiting Kalkbay harbour with her as you’ll never get away! Julie knows everyone in the industry, from fishermen to award winning chefs and is the tie that binds local, sustainable fishing with conscientious consumerism.

Tuna sashimi salad

Tuna sashimi salad

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Potters Market, Rondebosch

Kitchen Goddesses

Kitchen Goddesses 

This may not be about food, but it’s local and it’s food related. Pottery and ceramics play a vital role in presentation and deserve their share of the foodie spotlight.

Potters Market, Rondebosch Park

Potters Market, Rondebosch Park

Twice a year, in early autumn and late spring, the Western Cape branch of Ceramics Southern Africa hosts the Potters Market in Rondebosch park. I’d been warned to get there early and I did – just after 8 – and already the place was filling up fast.

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OURS Cafe, Kalk Bay

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OURS, 48 Main Road, Kalk Bay

Yesterday I met my friend Clare for lunch at OURS Cafe in Kalk Bay – simple fare, good company and the best coffee in Cape Town.

Dave Coleman from OURS

Dave Coleman from OURS

OURS is run by a group of surfer dudes/ coffee aficionados. They’re not trying to be the next Big Food Fad in Cape Town, they’re just keeping it real. The cafe has evolved from the original hole in the wall serving coffee and pastries to incorporate a beautiful courtyard area overlooking the ocean with lunch and dinner thrown in for good measure.

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Lunch Salad

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Truly Scrumptious

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A few weeks ago I was privileged to be invited to the launch of Jane-Anne Hobbs’s new recipe book ‘Scrumptious: Food for Family and Friends’. I’ve long been a fan of her Scrumptious food blog, where she shares her triple tested recipes and appetising anecdotes. Online she’s larger than life, in person she’s about two bricks and a tickey high but with a personality that fills the room. The woman has a way with people, words and food and the combination is quite delectable. This was a recipe book I had been keenly anticipating.

With Penny Haw at the Scrumptious launch. (Photo: Liesl Jobson, Random House Struik)

Back home it was time to don my apron and give these recipes a run for their money. I chose the beef fillet and potato salad with green goddess dressing  with a purpose – for years I’ve been trying to replicate one of my favourite meals from the eighties: a green goddess salad from the Front Page restaurant in Melville (Jhb). This recipe had all the elements and the sight of Tarragon in the ingredients gave me a thrill of hope.

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Bacon-Boy speaks…

“I’m out to cure the ills, not cause them.” – Martin Raubenheimer finds himself in a pickle…

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“During my formative years I linked the meat that I love so much to the contented animals that I saw grazing in the veld and scratching around on the “werf” of family farms. This led me to believe that the world was filled with caring carnivores. Then I grew up and reality bit. I got a job which took me to factory farms owned by “big business brains”. I know it’s claimed that feeding on the flesh of animals for well over 2 million years has increased the size of our brain but in recent times it certainly seems to have done the exact opposite to our hearts.

On these industrial size enterprises I witnessed how the wholesale production of cheap commercial meat in the pursuit of maximum profits has become, in the words of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, nothing short of “an ignominious expression of greed, indifference and heartlessness.” It was time to take a good hard look at my purchasing habits and focus on a more thoughtful, ethical and holistic way of life. No more “dirty meat” for me. It became my mission to seek out and support small local producers and hunt down naturally reared animals for the pot.

I found a group of genuinely ethical farmers who were more than happy to open their hearts and homes and allow me to experience first-hand how their pasture-based healthy meat is produced, slaughtered, processed and sold. Now I could sleep easily when it came to the welfare of the animals and just as importantly, because they don’t stuff them full of growth hormones or antibiotics, these suppliers can vouch for the wholesomeness of the meat.

Mission accomplished and fired up with enthusiasm, I signed on for a charcuterie course, built a smoker, got hold of some lovely “clean” pork and started makin’ bacon. My instructor, a highly respected local charcutier’s dry cure recipe called for a small quantity of pink salt (sodium nitrite) but I wasn’t keen to add this. My meat was pure and I wanted everything I made to be as natural as possible. So I consulted my hero Hugh’s book and was pleased to see that according to him all you really need for curing, whether you’re smoking or not, is coarse sea salt, brown sugar and a couple of herbs and spices, exactly what I wanted to hear.

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City Bowl Market on Hope

I love City Bowl Market. Biased? You bet. From the day they opened their doors they also opened their hearts and I was there. Right time, right place. I was new in Cape Town and the people of City Bowl Market took me in. They drew me in with their delectable wares, then ensnared me with their wonderful characters – good food and good people, two of my favourite things. Over time they’ve become my friends, their products my staples and their market my home-from-home.

Sweet Maddie

Every Saturday from 9am to 2pm the bright pink hall on Hope street becomes the City Bowl Market. After hours, it’s a church. The gracious old building has been many things to many people and currently it’s Madelen Johansson’s raison d’etre. The gorgeous Swede appears to take things in her stride, running her market with Ikea-like efficiency. What drives her is an inherent passion for good food markets – like those she experienced growing up in Sweden. Attracting top traders is no mean feat when you’re competing with other, more established Cape Town markets but CBM hosts a bunch of my local favourites.

That’s not coffee, Dave!

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Abraham de Klerk

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I don’t speak wine. I don’t know my legs from my nose and I wouldn’t know a flaccid wine if it hit me in the face. I do drink it though, in copious amounts and like everyone else I like what I like and the reasons are personal. It’s not just about taste, it’s the impression the wine creates in the mind, what it evokes – much like music or food or love. I learnt this from Abraham when he shared his wine and a bit of his soul with me. We shared our friends too: mine are not conversant in wine, his are; my friends brought bread, cheese and hangovers, his brought dark chocolate and Dalai Lama quotes. We broke bread and barriers and we shared it all over wine and a weathered wooden table at Druk My Niet Estate where Abraham de Klerk is the winemaker.

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He’s a romantic, an old soul, a man of passion. Abraham gets excited when speaking of his wines and the challenge to produce that one perfect vintage, that one perfect wine – the exact challenge that keeps driving him season after season. He doesn’t believe in half measures and resents the fact that he has to produce a marketable range as well as his top end wines as they require equal passion and dedication. He’s a balls to the wall, all or nothing kind of guy and he’s eager to make his mark.

 

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Gardener’s Glory Honey

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The simple honeybee: not only responsible for the pollination of many of our food crops, but for most of our cattle grazing as well. Without the honeybee and its flight of fertility, our diet would be sparse and seriously lacking in nutrition. With the demise of honeybees and humans reduced to bread and water, the irony is that honey is so filled with nutrients it alone could sustain human life. The role of the honeybee in the food chain is grossly under-estimated and under appreciated in society and it’s time we acknowledged our reliance upon the humble bee.

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Richard and Marjolijn are urban beekeepers and every bit as genuine as the raw, local honey they harvest. What started as a mild interest in beekeeping has blossomed into a major passion; the result is their beautifully pure Gardener’s Glory raw honey. Get to know this charming couple and listen as they wax eloquent about the importance of bees in nature, the benefits of honey and the downright deliciousness of their product. As Richard says: “Our honey has already taken us on so many adventures and brought so many kindred spirits our way…

 

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